Knowledge, Attitudes & Practices (KAP) of CPR+AED Survey 2020

Every two years, we survey Singaporeans to assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) and CPR+AED. In 2020, we surveyed 1,003 random Singaporeans aged 16 to 64, and we are heartened to see that the latest results show a further understanding of AEDs, an increase in CPR+AED training rates amongst Singaporeans, and willingness to help a stranger during an emergency.

Survey Questions

Note: Statistics presented may not add up to 100% due to the rounding-off effect. Respondents selected more than one answer for some questions.



Is cardiac arrest the same as a heart attack?

Yes: 48%
(46% in 2018)
No: 43%
(47% in 2018)
Don’t know: 9%
(8% in 2018)


Have you ever come across a cardiac arrest case?

Yes: 9%
(6% in 2018)
No: 89%
(92% in 2018)
Don’t know: 1%
(2% in 2018)

What did you do?

I helped by calling for an ambulance: 69%
(72% in 2018)
I helped by performing CPR: 26%
(7% in 2018)
I helped by using an AED: 8%
(2% in 2018)
I did not get involved at all: 10%
(22% in 2018)


When a person has a cardiac arrest, must CPR+AED be started immediately?

Yes: 68%
(78% in 2018)
No: 22%
(11% in 2018)
Don’t know: 7%
(11% in 2018)


If a stranger suddenly collapses, should you start CPR if he/she is:


Not breathing at all?
Yes: 87%
(88% in 2018)
No: 9%
(same as 2018)
Don’t know: 4%
(same as 2018)

Not breathing normally (e.g. gasping)?
Yes: 41%
(53% in 2018)
No: 48%
(21% in 2018)
Don’t know: 11%
(26% in 2018)

Still breathing normally?
Yes: 21%
(14% in 2018)
No: 72%
(80% in 2018)
Don’t know: 7%
(6% in 2018)

What number would you dial for an emergency ambulance?

995: 79%
(94% in 2018)
Wrong numbers: 12%
(6% in 2018)

Key Learnings

Cardiac Arrest vs Heart Attack

43% of the respondents (47% in 2018) could differentiate correctly between cardiac arrest and a heart attack.


Help during cardiac arrest

54% of respondents (47% in 2018) expressed willingness to help a stranger in an emergency situation – reflecting the waning of the bystander effect.


Change in CPR+AED learning attitudes

There is a significant increase in the number of individuals trained in CPR+AED. 50% of respondents (35% in 2018) have learned to perform CPR and 28% (18% in 2018) have learned to use an AED.



What are some reasons for not performing CPR on a stranger who collapses in public?

  • Afraid of harming the person: 48%
  • Afraid to be sued if the person dies: 18%
  • Mouth-to-mouth breathing is unhygienic: 29%
  • Being wrongfully accused of sexual harassment: 6%
  • Fear of embarrassment in public: 4%


Do you know what this sign means?

Yes: 83%
(77% in 2018)
No: 17%
(21% in 2018)


What are some reasons for not using an AED on a stranger who collapses in public?

  • An AED looks difficult to use: 42%
  • I do not think I am allowed to use an AED: 14%
  • An AED will not help the person: 8%
  • Afraid that an AED will harm the person: 8%
  • Don’t know how to use an AED: 7%


Who do you think is allowed to use an AED?

Only persons who have been trained before: 68%
(65% in 2018)
Doctors and nurses: 34%
(40% in 2018)
Anyone (including me): 42%
(24% in 2018)

Research Methodology

  1. Face-to-face survey using tablets
  2. Door-to-door, random sampling methods
  3. Sample size:
    1. Members: n=1,003
    2. Singaporeans aged 16 to 64